We at Furry Friends are reeling from the changes happening in the world outside, as we know you are. We’re thinking about the people out there who are anxious, homebound or sick—and all of your animals too. We’re also working to continue to provide services where we can, including making sure that you have good and practical information about how this virus may impact you and your family, including its animal members. Please stay safe!

How Furry Friends Is Responding To COVID-19

Furry Friends is open for adoptions by appointment

Furry Friends is still open for adoptions by appointment only. Please view the available cats on our website or contact information@furryfriendswa.org for an appointment. We are taking extra precautions that your trip to the Halfway House will be a safe experience.

At this time we are not taking in any new cats. We need to depend on additional care from our veterinarians when we take in a new cat. The vets have been ordered to only deal with emergency cases until the crisis situation calms down. Thank you to our community for their understanding.

Jethro rubbing a human's leg

Preparing Cats for Your Return to Work

Nomi Berger discusses how to re-adjust your cat for when you're back at work and no longer constantly at home.

"While one of the most enjoyable experiences of working from home throughout the COVID-19 pandemic may be the extra time you’ve spent with your cats, the downside may be their separation anxiety when you return to work."

COVID-19 Virus and Cats

Nomi Berger has just written a Cat Tale story for us about questions you may have about cats and the virus.

"According to a vet with the American Veterinary Medical Association, there have been no cases of [domestic house] cats testing positive for or showing signs of the disease. And although there is a coronavirus specific to cats, it isn’t contagious to humans."

Working from Home As the New Normal

Once again, Nomi has written another article relating to cats, this time about how to work from home with your cats around!

"Cats are, essentially and notoriously, creatures of habit. And while some may relish your sudden availability — whether it’s to play with them, pet them or cuddle with them – others may find your presence disrupts the peace and calm of their daily routine."

Tips on Preventing COVID-19


COVID-19 Response and Information

Furry Friends is focused on protecting the health and well-being of the animals in our care, our volunteers, and the community we serve. We appreciate your patience and understanding as we navigate this situation together with the communities we serve.

Who will care for your pet?

While it’s not fun to imagine, now is an important time to create a plan for your pet in case you get sick. We strongly encourage you to gather any members of your household and walk through the following steps to ensure your animals will be well cared for in the event of an emergency.

With your whole family on board and a plan in place, you’ll feel a bit better about your pet’s safety knowing they’re in good hands no matter what challenges may arise. 

  1. Know the facts: According to the CDC, there is no evidence that people can get COVID-19 from pets. The best place for your animal is inside the home they know and love. If you aren’t feeling well but are still able to provide care for your pet, please keep them at home with you where they’re most comfortable.
  2. If you do become too ill to physically care for your pet or you need to be hospitalized, who can take over for you? Is there anyone else in your home who could help? Maybe a neighbor, friend, coworker, or family member who could take them in? Even a groomer, daycare, or boarding facility may be able to help in your time of need with advance notice. But the most important thing you can do today is come up with two potential pet plans and talk directly with those people so they’re prepared in case they’re called to action.
  3. Prepare a pet supply kit. It may not seem necessary today, but we promise it will be hugely helpful if you find yourself in an emergency situation without the ability to track down the proper supplies. Your kit should include the following, as best as you’re able:
    1. Name and contact information for the person who can care for your pet
    2. Name and contact information for your back-up in case your go-to is no longer able to help
    3. Food, treats, a leash, a couple of toys, and any other supplies necessary to care for your pet for at least two weeks
    4. A crate or carrier to transport your pet
    5. Vaccination records
    6. Collars with ID tags (and don’t forget to make sure your pet’s microchip information is up to date)
    7. Medications and prescriptions, along with a list of instructions
    8. Daily care instructions
    9. Contact information for your veterinary clinic